Review of The Four Basic Levels of Learning

Certified Flight Instructors (CFI) are taught that there are four basic levels of learning: Rote, Understanding, Application, and Correlation.⁠1 There are other variants of these levels, but the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) uses this set in their publications and exams, so we will also. Let’s review each level.

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Aviation Altitudes and Altimeters

Understanding the fundamentals of altitudes and altitude reporting systems (altimeters) is important for flight planning, performance calculations, regulatory compliance, and in-flight problem solving. This subject is covered early in training for the Private Pilot Certificate, but I found it often needs review even up to the Certified Flight Instructor Certificate training level, thanks primarily to disuse.

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Aviation Knowledge Test Preparation Books/Software: Don’t Short Yourself Or Fellow Pilots

Test preparation software and/or books exist for almost every test imaginable, including the required pilot knowledge tests for certificates and ratings. Their formula is simple: provide all of the known questions on the test and their answers. With this data provided, pilots can choose the “easy” way of preparing for the knowledge test or the “hard” way. What are we talking about, and which way is better?

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Pilots: There Is Only One Definition Of Night

It is commonly taught that there are three definitions of “night” that pilots need to be concerned with. They involve logging flight time, carrying passengers, and periods for required illumination of aircraft lighting. There aren’t three definitions: there is only one. Let’s take a three-minute trip through the wonderful world of Federal Aviation Regulations (FARs).

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Electronic vs Mechanical Flight Computers (E6B and CX2)

For many decades, students, pilots, and flight instructors have been debating a very important flight training industry question: Should I use an electronic or mechanical flight computer? Well, it isn’t THAT important, but this question was debated even back in the 1990s when I first started flying, and still is with today’s generation of pilots. What’s all the debate about? I’ll give you my opinion in less than 600 words (a two-minute read).

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Helicopter Student Pilot Record Keeping

“How do I best setup my pilot logbook?” Unfortunately, I hear this question rarely. Every new student pilot should ask it. Federal Aviation Regulations specify the required events to log in a pilot logbook, and the endorsements required for various pilot certificates and operations. However, there is little guidance for helicopter pilots discussing what other categories of flight time should be logged in order to meet actual employer requirements for helicopter pilot jobs.

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