Quote on Decision-Making

I saw this quote (with no source listed) regarding in-flight weather decision-making posted on a wall the other day and thought it was well said: “The least experienced pilots press on, while the more experienced turn back to join the most experienced who never left the ground in the first place.

Aviation Altitudes and Altimeters

Understanding the fundamentals of altitudes and altitude reporting systems (altimeters) is important for flight planning, performance calculations, regulatory compliance, and in-flight problem solving. This subject is covered early in training for the Private Pilot Certificate, but I found it often needs review even up to the Certified Flight Instructor Certificate training level, thanks primarily to disuse.

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What Are Known Icing Conditions?

You are about to go on a helicopter training flight at a local airport. There’s an Airmen’s Meteorological Information (AIRMET) Zulu posted for icing inclusive of your area of flight. Your helicopter has the following limitation written in the Rotorcraft Flight Manual (RFM): “Flight into known icing conditions prohibited.” Can you fly?

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Do You Know About HEMS Tool?

When planning a flight in marginal visual flight conditions, one thing we helicopter pilots realize is that the only weather reports we get in a briefing are Aviation Routine Weather Reports (METARs) and Terminal Area Forecasts (TAFs) from airports, or Area Forecasts (FA) and Weather Synopses covering larger areas. We then have to visualize the ceilings and visibilities between those ground reporting stations. If we are going to or launching from an off-airport site, that complicates our decision-making. While Weather Depiction graphics can help, another great tool in our flight planning toolbox is the Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) Tool from the National Weather Service.

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Understanding Special Visual Flight Rules (SVFR)

You recently received your Commercial Pilot Certificate for Rotorcraft-Helicopter and have arrived via taxicab at Thief River Falls Regional Airport (KTVF). It’s 1300Z and you’re going to pickup and ferry a helicopter to another airport about 300nm away. Looking at the Sectional Chart, you see that the airport is not towered.

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Quiz: Part 91 Cloud Clearances and Visibility for VFR and SVFR Flight